Importance of Trees
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CLEAR in Buckhaven reflect on the affects of Storm Arwen and the importance of trees for the environment.

Due to Storm Arwen on 26/10/21, Forest Chiefs estimate 8 million trees were fallen or damaged.  Scottish Forestry along with Forestry and Land Scotland are working together to plan the recovery and future.

Areas of Scotland have been mapped using a new tool developed by Forestry and Forest Research which uses satellite data to gain an understanding of where the damage has occurred, which allows forestry workers to stay safe and not risk entering into potentially risky areas.  Most of the damage occurred down the East Coast, across the Borders and E. Lothian stretching into Galloway, whilst another swathe of damage ran through Banffshire, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Angus into Perthshire.  4,000 hectares are seen to be damaged, this includes many standing trees but their roots are severely damaged.

Environmental Minister Mairi McAllan states “Storm Arwen provided a saluatory lesson of the power of nature and the challenges of climate change.  Our people suffered and so too did our natural environment.  The impact of the distressing images of flattened forests and woodland, will take decades of not centuries to recover from.  Their loss reminds of the significant roles which trees play in our lives, communities, economy and wellbeing.

Around 62 million trees are planted in Scotland every year and here at Clear we can say we have planted a fair few of these. 

On a Thursday recently we have been having tree planting sessions throughout the Buckhaven and Methil area.  This activity is open for any members of the public to join in and we will be continuing this into the New Year as this is the main fruit tree planting time.

We rely on trees for our oxygen supply and continual photosynthesis for growth and carbon dioxide capture. It would also be helpful to the environment if you recycled your natural Christmas tree or in future buy a bare rooted tree and plant it back into the ground so you can use it again next year.

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